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Company History

American Asphalt Paving, Inc. (1955 - 2002)

 

1955

Founded by Wallace Braatz & his uncle, Leo Braatz,  American Asphalt Paving, Inc., was officially incorporated in the State of Wisconsin on April 13, 1955.

American, began by providing paving services to homeowners and businesses using an asphalt product named  “RAMCOAT” which was developed by the Minnesota Mining Company. RAMCOAT was delivered to American’s facility by means of railroad cars.

  

1959

Leo Braatz retired and sold his shares of American Asphalt Paving, Inc. stock to Wallace Braatz.

 

1960

In 1960, American Asphalt Paving, Inc. merged with Strudell Asphalt Company, Inc. of Milwaukee, WI and was made a division of that entity. Wallace was a director of the company.

 

1963

American Asphalt Paving, Inc. was reactivated as a separate corporation and fifty percent interest was sold to Vincent Gleason, a former employee of Strudell Asphalt Company, Inc. The business operated as a paving contractor and was located in Milwaukee, WI.

 

1964

American relocated its operations to Menomonee Falls and purchased its first continuous mix asphalt plant, which was manufactured by Wylie™. It produced 20 tons of mix per hour.

 

1968

American expanded it operations again by purchasing a larger asphalt plant, a Barber-Greene® continuous mix unit, which produced 60 tons of mix per hour. It was at this time that American moved its operations to its current location on West Silver Spring Road and constructed its brand new office building.

 

1969

A 6,000 square foot shop building was constructed to facilitate American’s on-site equipment maintenance and repairs.

 

1971

American Asphalt Paving, Inc. expanded its market share by opening a subsidiary company, American Bituminous Corporation, in Plymouth, Wisconsin. The new asphalt production facility served the asphalt paving needs of the surrounding area for nearly three years before divesting the entity.

 

1972

Having outgrown its current asphalt production capabilities and doubling its sales force due to increased demands, American purchased a 125 tons per hour Hetherington & Berner™ (H&B™) batch plant which was their main source for producing asphalt until 1990. It served as American’s back-up production source until 2010, when it was finally retired.

 

 1979

The first two 200-ton capacity storage silos were purchased and erected in order to keep up with the increasing demand for more asphalt materials, which were needed for the growing amounts of larger paving projects American was becoming accustomed to constructing.

 

1982

Wallace Braatz purchased the remaining fifty percent shares of stock from his partner, Vince Gleason, making him the sole owner of American Asphalt Paving, Inc.

 

1984

Keith Braatz (son of Wallace) joined the company as Vice President to assist in sales, operations management, cost control implementation, and managerial accounting.

 

Betty (Mickey) Braatz (wife of Wallace) joined the company in July as office manager, bookkeeper, and Secretary Treasurer. Mickey remained at American Asphalt Materials until her passing in early 2009.

 

1986

Robert Braatz (son of Wallace & Betty) joined the business in September to assist with the internal accounting and implement the company’s first multi-user computerized data processing system.

 

1988

Wallace Braatz retired, leaving Keith (President) and Robert (Vice President). Wallace remained an active Board Member and advisor to Keith and Robert until his passing in late 2009.

 

1989

American’s office building underwent a major renovation and addition in order to provide the much-needed additional space for its growing office personnel and sales force. 

 

1990

American purchased its fourth asphalt plant to date, an APT™ 250-ton per hour continuous mix drum design. The APT™ plant was American’s primary source for producing its asphalt mixes until it was retired in 2011.

 

1991

American’s first attempt at “going green” began when it purchased its first rock crusher. The crusher enabled the organization to begin recycling its broken asphalt slabs. The crushed asphalt material commonly referred to, as Reclaimed Asphalt Product (RAP) became a key ingredient for producing its asphalt mixes henceforth. Since implementing the use of RAP in its mixes, American Asphalt has significantly helped to reduce the wasteful dumping of asphalt into area landfills.

 

1994

Joel Braatz (Keith’s oldest son) joins the company and begins working as a full-time crewmember within American’s asphalt grading and paving operations.

 

1997

American purchased its third 200-ton capacity asphalt storage silo, which provided the ability to store a total of 600 tons of asphalt mix on-hand at one given time.

 

American replaces its original rock crusher with a newer and significantly larger machine in order to supply its growing need for recycled materials.

 

1999

Ryan Braatz (Keith’s younger son) joins the company full-time and begins working as a crewmember within American’s asphalt paving operation.

American purchased a 55-acre gravel pit located in Hubertus, WI; where it began producing its own raw materials with the use of its second crushing operation. The gravel pit served as American’s main source for virgin aggregates (one of the primary ingredient used for the production of hot- mix asphalt) until 2003.

 

2000

Begins accepting broken concrete slabs, which were then crushed into a recycled aggregate material. The crushed concrete aggregate could then be sold and used as an acceptable base material for building parking lots and other pavement structures.

 

 

 

 

American Asphalt Materials, LLC (2003 to present)

 

2003

Like many so many others at the time, American Asphalt Paving, Inc. went through its share of economic hardships during the economic recession of 2001 -directly following the the September 11th terrorist attacks on the United States and the dot-com bubble burst. In late 2002, American Asphalt Paving, Inc. reluctantly ceased its in-house asphalt paving and grading operations. The company was restructured and a new company was born - American Asphalt Materials, LLC.  Its core focus would become its asphalt mix operations, asphalt pavement consulting, and project management services.

 

Currently, American Asphalt Materials is Metro-Milwaukee’s only major asphalt production source whose sole purpose is to produce and supply materials to the area’s many independently owned and non-producing asphalt paving and sealcoating contractors as well as the area's many public works departments and utility companies. 

 

2008

American Asphalt Materials added its fourth 200-Ton storage silo, which enables it to hold 800 tons of asphalt mix for its customers at any given time.

American establishes a brand-new sealcoating products division. Exclusive distribution agreements were established with The Brewer Company of Milford, Ohio, which allowed American to service and supply the area’s surrounding sealcoating contractors with Brewer Cote™ high-solids pavement sealer, crack sealants, and an assortment of complementary products.

 

2010

American added its fifth 200-ton storage silo to its asphalt plant operation; allowing it to hold 1,000 tons of asphalt mix for its customers at any given time.

American goes “greener” by implementing the use of Reclaimed Asphalt Shingles (RAS) into its finished asphalt mix designs. American’s use of RAS in its production methods has substantially helped to reduce the negative environmental impact associated with discarding old and worn-out roofing shingles into landfills. It also provides structural and economical benefits to paving contractors and property owners as well.

 

2011

Jeremy Braatz (Robert’s youngest son) joined American Asphalt Materials, LLC as the primary asphalt plant operator.

 

2012

American Asphalt Materials takes “going green” to the next level by purchasing their fifth asphalt plant, a Stansteel ® Rotary Recycle Mixer™ and Accu-Shear™ foaming generator. The ultra-modern plant design enables American to continue their legacy by producing its highest quality mixes to date while at the same time continuing to further its environmentally conscious initiatives.

 

Began implementing “Warm-Mix Asphalt” technology. The state-of-the-art “green” technology provides significant benefits for the asphalt paving contractor as well as for the natural environment.

  

man made pond

BUILDING A MAN-MADE POND - 1950'S

 

 Advertisment from 1956

MILWAUKEE JOURNAL ADVERTISEMENT - 1956

 

American Strudel Logo

AMERICAN-STRUDELL - 1960

 

New Plant 1972

NEW H&B ASPHALT PLANT - 1972

 

early Paving Bishop Woods

PAVING BISHOP'S WOODS OFFICE PARK IN BROOKFIELD - 1987

 

Street Paving

CITY OF WAUWATOSA STREET PAVING- 1985

  

FIRST ASPHALT RECYCLER PURCHASED - 1991

 

PAving a subdivision

PAVING HUNTER'S RIDGE SUBVISION IN MENOMONEE FALLS - 1987

 

brochure photo

 

 

Magaizing cover

FRONT COVER OF EQUIPMENT MAGAGZINE

 

HUBERTUS GRAVEL PIT

   

Street Paving

CITY OF GLENDALE STREET PAVING - 1999

  

Street Paving

PAVING APPLETON AVE. IN MENOMONEE FALLS - 2002

 

  FOURTH SILO ADDITION - 2008

 

Drum Mixer

AMERICAN UPGRADES TO THEIR ULTRA-GREEN DRUM MIXER - 2012